5 minutes reading time (1022 words)
Featured 

For Such A Time As This

What Is God Way Of Doing Things?

The book of Esther is frequently used to teach the strength of character of a Godly, virtuous and determined woman. All of this is true, however, the book of Esther has tremendous depth and offers far reaching insight into the question, What Is God Way Of Doing Things? Esther provides excellent examples of some of the general principles and operation of God’s universe, even though the book does not directly mention God or the Lord.

The events of the book of Esther took place about the time of Ezra and Nehemiah, circa 492-460 BC. Esther reveals some basic principles of God’s character and His Law. It also reveals the significant differences between the Old and the New Covenants. Covenant are the agreements that God established with man, the Old Covenant or Old Testament and the New Covenant or New Testament (see IDEOLATRY Chapter 12, p. 147). There is a clear change in the manner in which God interacts with humans after the establishment of the New Covenant. The book of Esther helps us understand the Old Covenant operation, the need for a New Covenant, and the results that the New Covenant would bring, some 500 years before Jesus ushered in the New Covenant.

Much respect for authority and protocol has been lost in our everyday, contemporary society, and continues to erode. The result of this erosion is a lack of understanding and appreciation of the authority of God and the respect that He should command in our lives. As Esther opens, a drama and the struggle between the cast of characters begins to unfold. Throne room etiquette is explained and an allegory to the unchangeable nature of the established law of God is revealed. Several key individuals are introduced in the beginning of the narrative.

Xerxes of Persia was a pagan, non-Jewish King, also known as Ahasuerus. He reigned from 486-465 BC in the city of Shushan, together with his queen, Vashti. Mordecai was the son of Jair, a Benjamite, one of the twelve tribes of Israel and he was the chief minister of Ahasuerus. Mordecai had previously been carried into captivity by Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon. His custom was to sit daily at the gate of the king’s palace, observing and listening. Esther was Mordecai’s cousin, and after her parents died, he took her in as his daughter. Haman is the final key character. He was chief of the princes of the court of King Ahasuerus. Haman was like a Prime Minister, bestowed with honor and authority before the king.

The narrative begins with a royal drama involving the disobedience of Queen Vashti. She was summoned by the King to make an appearance during a celebration at his court, but she refused the command of the King. This was considered to be an act of rebelliousness and defiance. Her action caused her to pay dearly. Had her defiance against the King’s sovereignty been allowed to stand, it would have established an unacceptable precedent, potentially encouraging other wives of the princes and rulers to rebel against their husbands. The King’s advisors decided to make a “royal example” of her for the sake of order in the kingdom and petitioned the King to expel her from the King’s court. Ahasuerus made a law that stripped her of her position and privilege, and a search for a replacement queen was begun as described in Esther 1:12, 15, 19-22.

Esther 1:12, 15, 19-22

12 But the queen Vashti refused to come at the king’s commandment by his chamberlains: therefore was the king very wroth, and his anger burned in him.

15 What shall we do unto the queen Vashti according to law, because she hath not performed the commandment of the king Ahasuerus by the chamberlains?

19 If it please the king, let there go a royal commandment from him,
and let it be written among the laws of the Persians and the Medes, that it be not altered, That Vashti come no more before king Ahasuerus; and let the king give her royal estate unto another that is better than she.
And when the king’s decree which he shall make shall be published throughout all his empire, (for it is great,) all the wives shall give to their husbands honour, both to great and small. And the saying pleased the king and the princes; and the king did according to the word of Memucan: For he sent letters into all the king’s provinces, into every province according to the writing thereof, and to every people after their language, that every man should bear rule in his own house, and that it should be published according to the language of every people.

The fairness of the King’s action is not the subject of this discussion, as it could be hotly debated. The ways of the King are not to be compared to God’s actions. The important aspect of this situation is the understanding of law and obedience, in that, once a decree is spoken or written by the authority or law-giver, it is absolute and unchangeable. There was an existing protocol for activity within the court of the King and Vashti disobeyed it. The result was the formation of a law that was unalterable, even by the King himself. This situation is a reflection of the integrity and stability of God’s Laws. It is also a direct correlation to the authority and unalterable nature of the Word of God. God’s Words, once spoken by Him, become absolute and unchangeable, even by God, Himself.

This is a very important concept to understand. God can’t go against His own Word. He can’t change it because of His own Words and won't change it because of His character.

 

May God richly bless you in all that you do! - Dr Rich Masek 

 

I invite you to read Chapter 18, UNWAVERING INTEGRITY – THE UNCHANGEABLE LAW in

 Ideolatry - God Is Not Your Problem

To learn more about how Ideolatry can affect your life. 

 

 Available in digital formats for Kindle, iBooks, Nook and Generic eReaders

You can read about more subjects from Ideolatry below.

The Concept of Absolutes
Ushering In God’s Plan
 

Comments 2

Guest - Michael on Thursday, 15 August 2019 11:31
King’s court

Hi Rich,

Great analogy of God and His word. I never really thought of the book of Ester in that manner so thanks for the insight. My grasp of the book is the king’s court and Ester entering without being summoned. In those days you could not enter without the king’s summoning you or it would be death unless the king raised his scepter to you and then all would be good. This was what happened when Ester entered his court to ask for his permission to have a banquet. I look at this scenerio as a look into the future plans for Jesus paving the way to get into God courtyard without being killed. The Bible teaches that the scepter shall never depart from Judah. even though the book of Ester does not mention God or Lord, the message is still there that God is showing a way to Him without the possibility of being put to death. We only have one way to the throne of God without receiving death and that is by the way of Jesus’ work on the cross. Let me know what you think. God bless.

Hi Rich, Great analogy of God and His word. I never really thought of the book of Ester in that manner so thanks for the insight. My grasp of the book is the king’s court and Ester entering without being summoned. In those days you could not enter without the king’s summoning you or it would be death unless the king raised his scepter to you and then all would be good. This was what happened when Ester entered his court to ask for his permission to have a banquet. I look at this scenerio as a look into the future plans for Jesus paving the way to get into God courtyard without being killed. The Bible teaches that the scepter shall never depart from Judah. even though the book of Ester does not mention God or Lord, the message is still there that God is showing a way to Him without the possibility of being put to death. We only have one way to the throne of God without receiving death and that is by the way of Jesus’ work on the cross. Let me know what you think. God bless.
Rich Masek on Thursday, 15 August 2019 11:42
The King's Court

Mike,

Thanks for the comment and insight. I wrote more extensively about this in Ideolatry, Chapter 18. The Sceptre that you noted could actually be considered a "type" of Jesus and represents the grace of God being extended through Jesus as we approach His throne.

Thanks for your involvement.

Rich

Mike, Thanks for the comment and insight. I wrote more extensively about this in Ideolatry, Chapter 18. The Sceptre that you noted could actually be considered a "type" of Jesus and represents the grace of God being extended through Jesus as we approach His throne. Thanks for your involvement. Rich
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Monday, 14 October 2019

Captcha Image

200 OK

OK

The server encountered an internal error or misconfiguration and was unable to complete your request.

Please contact the server administrator, [no address given] and inform them of the time the error occurred, and anything you might have done that may have caused the error.

More information about this error may be available in the server error log.